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Today I read those words on a facebook post. They were related to first responders. I am not sure that I would call mental health a crisis, sure, there is more awareness today. We are not turning our backs on those that need help. First responders are being trained on the different options that are out there to alleviate some of the issues that could go along with the arrest of an individual with amental health diagnosis.

My personal journey began over 10 years ago with a visit to the ER. I knew that I could not go on and admitted myself. I was boarded for four days and basically ignored by the staff. When a bed became available, I was taken to a local psychiatric unit. There I met people with other diagnoses who had been through the system time and time again. Some of them could not afford meds, others did not have access to healthcare, and still others did not have any support from family or friends. They would get well, get discharged, and wind up back inpatient.

That was over a decade ago. The same things are still happening. So many people are still undiagnosed or cannot afford the medications to keep them out of the hospital. 

I am not sure we are in anymore of a crisis then we were 10 years ago. Still, because of those people, like myself, who speak out about their illness the issue is getting noticed. I am thankful for that. The fact that government and health care companies are offering more help is wonderful! 

One day, I hope mental illness will be accepted.  That medications will be available to all of those who need them. That companies will hire more people with disabilities in general. One day I hope that things will change. Yet again, I would not call this a crisis. I would call this a change in attitude and procedure.

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